Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th International Conference on Vascular Dementia Valencia, Spain.

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Day 2 :

OMICS International Vascular Dementia 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker David Truswell photo
Biography:

David Truswell has worked in community based mental health services in the UK for over thirty years developing services for people with complex care needs and enduringrnmental health problems in a career spanning the voluntary sector, local authority services and the NHS. From 2009 – 2011, he was the Dementia Implementation Lead forrnCommissioning Support for London, working with commissioners across London to improve dementia services. He is an independent writer and researcher on dementia support and services for Black and minority ethnic communities, working with a number of projects and initiatives.

Abstract:

London, the UK capital is home to 58% of all those who identified themselves as African-Caribbean in the UK 2011 National Census.

It is demographically the oldest of the Black populations in the Census categories and proportionally has a higher rate of dementia than the White UK majority. With research indicating that vascular dementia and early onset dementia are a growing issuesrnfor Caribbean men under the age of 65 strong cultural beliefs lead many of those most at risk to dismiss any mainstream efforts atrnpreventative health education. Denial of problems and refusal to seek help or diagnosis can often lead to a major crisis before therernis any engagement with professional support services and frustrate efforts to develop ongoing links with services. Culture Dementia UK a voluntary organization has been working on awareness raising and providing support in the African-Caribbean community inrnLondon. The presentation explores how the African-Caribbean cultural narrative of independence and resilience mitigates againstrnhelp-seeking in dementia and some of the approaches adopted by Culture Dementia UK to raise awareness and encourage people to look for support.

Break:

Keynote Forum

Howard J Federoff

University of California, USA

Keynote: Blood biomarkers in preclinical Alzheimer Disease

Time : 09:40-10:20

OMICS International Vascular Dementia 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Howard J Federoff photo
Biography:

Howard J Federoff over sees the clinical, medical educational, and research missions, as a Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs and CEO of UC Irvine Health. He investigatesrngene therapy and neurodegenerative diseases. He has published greater than 250 articles and serves on the editorial boards of five journals. He Chaired the NIHrnRecombinant DNA Advisory Committee and currently Chairs the Gene Therapy Resource Program for NHLBI. He is President of the American Society for Experimental Neurotherapeutics. He received MS, PhD, and MD degrees from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, did his internship, residency, and clinical and research fellowshipsrnat Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School. He is a Fellow of the AAAS and National Academy of Inventors.

Abstract:

Our group has studied a longitudinal cohort of seniors, >75 yrs, to discover and validate peripheral blood measures that canrnaccurately predict which cognitively normal subjects will progress to amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI) or Alzheimer disease (AD) in a three year period. We initially reported on plasma metabolites which are now more accurate as a diagnostic. We havernextended this work on plasma metabolomics and have discovered and validated a panel of 24 analytes that predict phenoconversionrnto Alzheimer’s disease with accuracy of >96%.

Keynote Forum

Jane Verity

Dementia Care, Australia

Keynote: A new whole systems approach to rehabilitation in dementia

Time : 10:20-11:00

OMICS International Vascular Dementia 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jane Verity photo
Biography:

Jane Verity is the Founder of Spark of Life and CEO of Dementia Care Australia. She is a world leader and pioneer in the social and emotional care of people with dementia.rnOriginally from Denmark and now living in Melbourne, Australia, she is an Occupational and Family Therapist and a Master Practitioner in NLP. She has earned the highestrninternational accreditation as a professional speaker and is known for her life changing presentations. She has authored 2 internationally published books and contributedrnto others. She is also a regular contributor to journals and an international key note presenter

Abstract:

The Spark of Life Philosophy provides an internationally awarded whole systems approach to rehabilitation in dementia care. Initially developed in Australia this philosophy is now implemented in 9 countries and is gaining momentum and interest around the world. The award (from the International Association of Homes and Services for the Ageing) was giving in recognition for thernunique focus on building the strength and abilities of people with dementia and those who care for them. The philosophy has been well researched and is based on sound scientific foundations. Specific outcomes include: the activation of dormant abilities such asrnlanguage, memory, ability to socialize and interest in engaging in life. The author who is the Founder of Spark of Life and CEO of Dementia Care Australia will provide a leadership perspective of how this philosophy is implemented as a whole systems approachrnand how this rehabilitation mindset is both empowering and providing a financially sustainable model for dementia care across thernglobe. The presentation will be brought alive with documentary footage showing people with dementia involved in this program asrnwell as research findings and case studies.

OMICS International Vascular Dementia 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Panteleimon Giannakopoulos photo
Biography:

Panteleimon Giannakopoulos has completed his MD from the University of Athens and is board certified psychiatrist and psychotherapist from 1999. He completed his Postgraduaterntraining in London and Paris before taking the chair of old age psychiatry in Geneva. He has also a full training in cognitive neurosciences focusing on dementing conditions. He was the chairman of the Department of Psychiatry in Geneva from 2005 to 2015 before being appointed as medical director of the Forensic Psychiatry forrnthe Geneva country. He has published more than 220 peer-reviewed articles (H index: 42), and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member and reviewer of repute.

Abstract:

We investigated whether subtle cognitive deterioration in healthy elderly individuals could be predicted by ASL imaging andrnEEG markers. A longitudinal study included 75 stable controls (sCON) and 73 deteriorated controls (d-CON) at 18-monthrnclinical follow-up and 65 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Continuous EEG was recorded during a n-back workingrnmemory task and two-dimensional pulsed ASL was performed at the baseline visit. Reduced ASL in the posterior cingulate cortexrnwas associated with the development of subtle neuropsychological deficits. Three EEG indices distinguished the two control groups:rnalpha and beta even related desynchronization (dCON > sCON) and beta inter-trial coherence (dCON < sCON). These results willrnbe discussed as a paradigm of predictive biomarkers in preclinical forms of dementia.

OMICS International Vascular Dementia 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Susan Scanland photo
Biography:

Susan Scanland is a Gerontological Nurse Practitioner for 34 years and also a Certified Dementia Practitioner (CDP). She is one of two nurse practitioners worldwidernholding the credential of Certified Speaking Professional (CSP) from the National Speakers Association. She has presented at over 600 meetings in 42 states, Canada andrnthe Caribbean through her business Dementia Connection®. She is a Faculty Specialist at the University of Scranton in Pennsylvania. Her clinical practice has been limitedrnto dementia, depression and delirium management for the past 12 years in long-term care and telehealth.

Abstract:

Research trials on cholinesterase inhibitors, memantine and antidepressants for behavioral and psychological symptoms inrnvascular/mixed dementia in long-term care settings are nearly non-existent. The absence of approved medications for vascularrndementia offers practicing clinicians few treatment options. Off-label use of Alzheimer’s approved drugs and antidepressants are morernpractical than risking pneumonia, hip fracture, cerebrovascular accidents and dysphagia from anti-psychotic use for vascular/mixed dementia behaviors. Long-term care admissions for vascular dementia will rapidly increase with Baby Boomers diagnosed withrnType II diabetes, obesity and cardiac or cerebrovascular risk factors. Behaviors of vascular and mixed dementia; often compoundedrnby vascular depression, significantly impact quality of life of long-term care residents, cohabitant residents, family members andrnnursing staff. A gerontological nurse practitioner/dementia consultant will review behavioral and mood responses to cholinesteraserninhibitors, memantine and anti-depressants in nursing home residents diagnosed with vascular and mixed dementia. Case studiesrnand informal surveys summarizing four years of long-term care dementia management will be presented.

  • Advances in Dementia Test, Dementia Pathophysiology, Dementia Care and Nursing
Location: Melia Valencia Palacio De Congresos
Speaker

Chair

Panteleimon Giannakopoulos

University of Geneva, Switzerland

Speaker

Co-Chair

Yung Cho Yiu

United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong

Session Introduction

Ann Marie Selfridge

University at Albany, USA

Title: Adults communicating together – A.C.T. care group

Time : 13:30-14:00

Speaker
Biography:

Ann Marie Selfridge is the President of the A.C.T. Care Group. She is a graduate from the University at Albany in New York State. She worked as part of the Administration team in Nursing/Rehabilitation facilities in New York City and has received the following awards: Certificate of Special Congressional Recognition to Recognize Initiative, Service and Achievement for Voluntary Public Service from United States Congress, Recognizing Service to Developmentally Disabled Adults and Children- a citation from New York State Assembly. He has a dedication towards making a good life for people with developmental disabilities and received a certificate of Merit from the NYS Assembly. He also received Honor for being an Exceptional Friend to the Bensonhurst Center for Rehabilitation and Healthcare and Certificate of Achievement from Senator Martin J Golden. He also received Proclamation Recognizing Valuable Service to the Community from New York City Council Citation.

Abstract:

Adults Communicating Together, A.C.T. is a comprehensive educational/social program that focuses on strengthening the brain functions of people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and Dementia. The A.C.T. program uses an innovative educational classroom model to engage participants with AD/D in exercises that promote learning and enhance cognitive stimulation. The A.C.T. Care Group recognizes the importance for people with AD/D to be involved in structured and closely managed educational/social groups that improves people’s ability to focus on their surroundings and increases participation in daily tasks to the highest possible levels. A.C.T Care professionals are trained to provide a nurturing and secure environment for all participants. The A.C.T. staff implements techniques that encourage people to maintain their health/hygiene, independence and ability to keep involved in activities of daily living. The A.C.T. program focuses on exercises in memory, physical movement and motor strengthening skills. Using a curriculum that provides repetitious consistency and structure, participants are able to successfully concentrate on tasks and keep aware of their surroundings. Participants have also demonstrated decreased wandering tendencies, less restlessness/anxiety, reduced episodes of incontinence and have desirable weight gains. The A.C.T. program goal is to increase health and cognitive functions, maximize independence, gain and maintain physical strength and provide an opportunity for people with AD/D to have a meaningful quality of life. The A.C.T. Team implements unique program strategies/methods, in an outpatient Social Adult Day setting that give people a chance to live at home with their families and remain active members in their communities.

Caitlin Hildebrand

Veterans Health Administration and American Care Quest Hospice, USA

Title: Elder self-neglect and dementia: Challenges for community based teams

Time : 14:00-14:30

Speaker
Biography:

Caitlin Hildebrand is an Adult and Gerontology Nurse Practitioner with significant experience in community based care teams, through the Program of All Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE), home health and hospice and quality improvement. With Masters in Health Administration and Nursing from University of California San Francisco and University of Pennsylvania, she is a published scholar on elder self-neglect and dementia. She has a passion for programs that support Aging in Place and a palliative approach to care for all frail people.

Abstract:

Elders with dementia are significantly more likely to neglect their own needs, and determining the role of cognitive impairment is a key factor in creating successful interventions for change. Community based care teams, be they clinic based, or from home health, are similarly confronted with the challenge of how to support independence while promoting wellness and safety. Through careful analysis of the multi-factorial nature of self-neglect, teams can create care systems that honour autonomy and prevent placement. Creativity, flexibility, and acceptance of the “dignity of risk” allow care providers to make an impact while supporting aging in place.

Reflecting on recent patients will allow a close intimate consideration of elders, who self-neglect and the risks and benefits of intervention.

Speaker
Biography:

Elisabeth L orangeFürst has completed her PhD from The University of Oslo, Norway and Postdoctoral studies at The University of Uppsala, Sweden. Since 2001, she is Professor at the Department of Social Anthropology, University of Oslo. She has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals and anthologies as well as three books and one edited volume. She has also been the editor of a Norwegian Journal in Social Sciences

Abstract:

Eight years ago a 53 years old man was rescued from a cardiac arrest that lasted 3/4 of an hour, an incident that subsequently led to a severe brain damage and the diagnosis of dementia. This man was not just anybody, he was my husband. In this sudden moment, I was thrown into a situation of participant observation, trained as I was in anthropology.

In this paper, I present some reflections from a perspective of being a next of kin as well as social researcher. My phenomenological focus will concentrate on the amazing influence that music seems to have had on his recovery, especially the way it seems to have encouraged his emerging sense of self and identity. Even though he is suffering from severe cognitive problems with orientation in time, space and vision, he is physically on his feet, walking around in a rather stable manner. While it seems that music has been important for his condition from the start, the last five years he has attended therapeutical music lessons twice a week, singing songs accompanied by the teachers' guitar. Astonishingly he has been able to learn new melodies as well texts, and lately we have observed emotional responses to the music that he performs which has not been observed before.

Speaker
Biography:

Tanya Clover has been involved in supporting organisational change across the health and social care sectors for over 20 years. Utilising her extensive knowledge of the practical application of person centered care models; she has a proven success record in directly influencing the experiences and outcomes for people living with dementia. Previously a Practice Development Consultant and Trainer for the University of Bradford School of Dementia Studies, she remains an accredited Dementia Care Mapping™ trainer for the University. She has spoken at the UK Dementia Congress and has published 2 articles relating to the use of Person Centred Thinking Tools.

Abstract:

Reform has taken place in England with the implementation of the Care Act (2014) and its expectation that all agencies, statutory and otherwise, must cooperate. Such cooperation, however, risks marginalising the most important voice, that of the abused person themselves. When acts of abuse in care settings are investigated, it often results in the dismissal or removal from roles of individuals deemed responsible for the acts. To prevent the reoccurrence of abuse we must look beyond the perpetrator to the systems that surround them. Protection will not come about simply from telling people what is right or wrong. If it were, society would enact laws and all abuse would cease. With the existing raft of legislation and human rights declarations worldwide we can see that this has not happened. Person-centred thinking tools are both a device and a process that can be used to drive and sustain change for individuals, teams, organisations, communities and societies. Their ultimate goal is to ensure that individuals have more choice and control through an ongoing loop of listening, learning and actions – in essence, realising their uniqueness as a person of equal standing to others. Person-centered thinking tools can support the transition from people living with dementia being passive recipients of care to their being recognised as equal and valued members of society. They herald a new progression, as services aspire to move beyond person centred support towards people living with dementia being attributed citizenhood.