Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th International Conference on Vascular Dementia Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Marina Zueva

Moscow Helmholtz Research Institute of Eye Diseases, Russia

Keynote: Nonlinear impacts on human brain for recovering of physiological and mental activity and for rehabilitation in extreme ambient conditions

Time : 09:00-09:40

Conference Series Vascular Dementia 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Marina Zueva photo
Biography:

Marina Zueva is a Professor of Pathophysiology. She completed her Graduation at Lomonosov Moscow State University; PhD and Biological Science Doctorate at Moscow Helmholtz Research Institute of Eye Diseases. Currently, she is the Head of the Division of Clinical Physiology of Vision at Moscow Helmholtz Research Institute of Eye Diseases. She is a member of International Society of Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision (ISCEV), European Association on Vision and Eye Research (EVER) and European Society of Retina Specialists (EURETINA). She has published over 10 peer-reviewed papers in English (over 86 in Russian) and presented over 65 topics at international conferences.

Abstract:

In 2015, we theoretically substantiated the hypothesis that there is the intimate link between the complexity of neural connections, nonlinear dynamics of physiological processes in the brain and the nonlinear characteristics of sensory environmental cues. The impact throughout the person's life of visual and other sensory environmental cues of a complex spatiotemporal structure is necessary for normal maturation, development, and aging of the brain. The theory associates the development and maintenance of healthy structure and activity of the neural networks of the brain and retina with the complexity of visual and other signals of the environment affecting the person, with his life experience of nonlinear stimulation. Hence, the need to maintain healthy fractal dynamics during life, using the natural and the artificial fractal cues when the dynamics of the brain’s function is disordered, or when there is a simplification of environmental stimuli. The use of fractal stimulation and other nonlinear effects can promote recovery of the function of the brain and the retina including neurodegenerative diseases, acting through the reactivation of neuroplasticity. Nonlinear stimulation therapy in medicine must become an essential element of therapeutic strategies for activating neuroplasticity and enhance the effectiveness of the treatment of some pathological conditions: glaucoma, retinitis pigmentosa, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, sleep disorders, and amblyopia. Technologies of nonlinear impacts may be applied in various other pathological conditions, which are accompanied by the simplification of at emporal pattern of the brain activity and the emergence of deterministic or tochastic dynamics of fluctuations of various physiological functions. For the recovery after brain injuries and strokes, it is possible to use nonlinear techniques of stimulation therapy in the offices (centers) on rehabilitation and psychological training. Application of non-linear technologies is also prospective in following areas: Gerontology- under normal physiological human aging, the loss of the memory and some other cognitive functions occurs. Nonlinear stimulation techniques may be useful for normalization and long-term preservation of cognitive functions and intelligence of older people, promoting mental longevity; sport- nonlinear stimulation techniques may be helpful for increasing and rapid recovery of mental and physical performance in severe physical or psychological stress in athletes and; work in the extreme environment- nonlinear stimulation techniques may be useful for restoration and enhancement of cognitive function, preservation of critical thinking in the extreme conditions of work and stress situations, including long-term space missions

Keynote Forum

Steven Benvenisti

National Trial Lawyers – Top 100 Lawyers – U.S.A

Keynote: Spring break: A true story of hope and determination

Time : 09:40-10:20

Conference Series Vascular Dementia 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Steven Benvenisti photo
Biography:

Steven Benvenisti is a Partner at a personal injury law firm specializing in TBI. He is one among the National Trial Lawyers (Top 100 Trial Lawyers). He has done his BS in 1990 and Juris Doctorate in the year 1993. He is the Vice-Chairman of BOD Mothers Against Drunk Driving National and BOD Brain Injury Alliance. He is the author of “Spring Break: A true story of hope and determination” regarding a brain injured college student who received long-term inpatient, outpatient care and rehabilitation. He was awarded with: US Senate Official Proclamation, US Congressional Citation and US House of Representatives Special Congressional Recognition.

Abstract:

Traumatic brain injury is the silent epidemic of our time. In spite of the millions who sustain a TBI every year, very few medical professionals, legal scholars, employers and educators understand the reality of what the survivor and family members experience. The most powerful way to get a full understanding of the impact of TBI is directly from the perspective of a survivor. I present this program as an attorney regarding a “law case” of an “All American” college student on vacation with his college friends. One night he was walking and was struck by a drunk driver’s vehicle. His parents were called in the middle of the night and asked to consent to organ donation due to their son’s severe traumatic brain injury and other catastrophic injuries. The parents declined to consent to organ donation and instead got a room in the hospital to be with their son 24/7. After seeing the powerful photographs of the student in a coma, the audience is delighted to learn that he awoke after almost two (2) weeks, survived and had a full recovery. They are then astounded by the announcement that the attorney speaker before them is actually the TBI survivor who is the feature of the program. The remainder of the program educates the audience about TBI from the perspective of the survivor and family, while also providing valuable tools to help them in their own professional and personal capacities when dealing with traumatic brain injury.

Keynote Forum

Eva Kudova

Czech Academy of Sciences, Czech Republic

Keynote: Neuroactive steroids as neuroprotective agents

Time : 10:20-11:00

Conference Series Vascular Dementia 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Eva Kudova photo
Biography:

Eva Kudova has been working at Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry in Prague, Czech Academy of Sciences (IOCB) since 2002. She completed her PhD in 2009 at Charles University in Prague. Then, she spent two years in the lab of Douglas F Covey, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri, USA. Her research interest includes Steroidal Chemistry. She has been working in the field of Steroidal Chemistry for more than 10 years. Her major avenue of investigation is “Design and synthesis of new neuroactive steroidal compounds and structure-activity relationship studies affording NMDARs ligands”. Also, she and her colleagues have proposed screening pipeline that should serve as a screening platform for neuroactive steroids targeting CNS diseases and showing neurosteroids’ drug-likeness.

Abstract:

Neuroactive compounds are synthetic analogues of neurosteroids that are naturally synthesized in the nervous tissue from cholestrol or steroidal precursors from peripheral sources. The neuroprotective effect of neurosteroids or neuroactive steroids is supposed to be realized via rapid, non-genomic mechanism. Multiple studies have been already performed to demonstrate efficacy of neurosteroids in the treatment of various central and peripheral nervous system diseases (e.g. ischemia, seizures, neurodegeneration, etc.). However, the mechanisms of neuroprotective effect of neuroactive steroids remain unclear and accumulating evidence indicate that this process can be regulated in multi-target manner. Moreover, neuroprotection include mechanisms protecting against neuronal injury/damage or degeneration according to acute or chronic origin of pathological process. As such, research targeting design and development of neuroprotective steroids with therapeutic potential is extremely challenging. In the last decade, we have synthesized a library of neuroactive steroids that act as potent negative modulators of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) that play significant role in learning and memory. Also, we have shown that these compounds do exhibit strong neuroprotective effect in in vivo models. Currently, our main avenue of investigation is development of an in vitro multiplexed screening platform to identify molecules with strong neuroprotective effect. Therefore, we have developed a methodology for neuroprotective effect screening in the model of glutamate/NMDAinduced excitotoxicity on embryonic cortex neurons. We conclude that pretreatment with our neurosteroids significantly reduced acute NMDA/L-glutamic acid excitotoxicity mediated by Ca2+ entry and consequent ROS release and caspase-3 activation. Compounds 6 (IC50=5.8 μM), 7 (IC50=12.2 μM), 9 (IC50=7.8 μM), 13 (IC50=1.1 μM) and 16 (IC50=8.2 μM) attenuated glutamate-induced Ca2+ entry more effectively than memantine (IC50=18.9 μM). Moreover, compound 13 was more effective than MK-801 (IC50=1.2 μM). This drop in Ca2+ level resulted in corresponding reactive oxygen species suppression and prevented glutamate-induced caspase-3 activation

Conference Series Vascular Dementia 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Deepa Vinoo photo
Biography:

Deepa Vinoo is the assistant director of Nursing,(Director of Memory Care ), NYC Health and Hospitals “As a team leader, I had an opportunity to really change our facility’s practice and culture to improve the quality of lives of residents who have dementia ... patient-centered care is the key.” As director of the Memory Care Unit at NYC Health  Hospitals/Coler, Deepa Vinoo leads an interdisciplinary team that utilizes innovative techniques to effectively, holistically, and compassionately care for residents diagnosed with dementia. She has been leading award winning project “ Reduction of Antipsychotics in Dementia Related Behavior’. Vinoo has spearheaded ongoing training that has updated Coler’s caregiving approach to align with Alzheimer’s Association best practices and has helped 95 percent of her team to earn National Council of Certified Dementia Care Practitioners certification. “Music & Memory” is a standout program led by Vinoo at Coler; this program uses familiar music to reach behind the veil of dementia in order to draw out persons hidden behind the disability and reengage them with the world. Through this and other advanced treatment programs led by Vinoo, Coler has achieved significant reduction in antipsychotic medication administered to residents diagnosed with dementia, increased engagement and satisfaction among residents’ families, and fostered better interaction between residents and staff – a relationship vital to improving successful long-term care. With more than 20 years of experience as a nursing instructor administrator and clinician, Vinoo holds an MSN degree in Psychiatric Nursing. Ms.Vinoo is a board certified gerontological Nurse and a Certified Dementia Care Practitioner.

 

Abstract:

Behavioral disturbances among patients with dementia, including agitation, aggression, and psychosis, form a constellation of symptoms referred to as behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). These impact heavily on resident’s quality of life, caregiver stress, and management options for the team. In the United States, the National Partnership to Improve Dementia Care, established a new national goal of reducing the use of antipsychotic medications in long-stay nursing home residents by providing person centered Comprehensive interdisciplinary care. Implement National partnership’s goals and CMS regulatory standards to improve Dementia Care. Improve the quality of care of residents with diagnosis of Dementia by providing person centered memory Care programs. Reduce falls and physical altercations by meaningful engagement. Reducethe usage of antipsychotics by implementing  non pharmacological behavior management in Dementia related behavior. This study was conducted in four Memory care units with 108 residents at an 815-bed long-term nursing care facility. All residents in Memory Care Units from last quarter of 2014 to 3rd quarter of 2016 were individually assessed for Physical Altercations, Fall, Usage of Music and Memory and Usage of Antipsychotics.

 

Keynote Forum

Katie Moraes de Almondes

Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil

Keynote: Insomnia and risk of dementia in the elderly

Time : 12:00-12:40

Conference Series Vascular Dementia 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Katie Moraes de Almondes photo
Biography:

Katie Moraes de Almondes is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte. She is a Coordinator of Sleep Clinic - Ambsono, Coordinator of the Service of Neuropsychology of Aging, and Coordinator of Emergence Psychology Service RN 192 (Mobile Emergency Service). She is the President of the Department of Neuroscience of Sleep Behavior at the Brazilian Association of Sleep. She is also a Member of the Brazilian Society of Neuropsychology (SBNp) and the Brazilian Society of Neuroscience and Behavior (SBNeC). She has experience in Psychology of Health, Psychophysiology: human chronobiology, neuropsychology sleep-sleep medicine, neuropsychology of aging, neuroscience and cognitive psychology. She has presented conferences at many Congresses throughout Brazil. She has attended the organization of the events of the Brazilian Congress of Neuropsychology and coordinates the Neuropsychology of Aging and Dementia Congress- CONED. She is author of many papers on subjects including sleep and cognition in elderly. She has published the book entitled, “Counting Sheep: What you need to know for your evening not to turn into a nightmare”. She works as a Counselor of the State Council for the Rights of the Elderly at Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Brazil (CEDEPI).

Abstract:

There are cross-sectional evidences of an association between sleep disorders and cognitive impairment on older adults. However, there is no consensus by means of longitudinal studies data on the increased risk of developing dementia related to insomnia. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the risk of incident all-cause dementia in individuals with insomnia in population-based prospective cohort studies. The results showed that insomnia was associated with a significant risk for dementia. In addition, we have data showing that sleep complaints in non-demented elderly, mainly insomnia, provoke phonemic fluency, motor programming, inhibitory control and working memory impairment. All these processes for which sleep complaints determined impairment are cognitive abilities controlled and can be considered executive functions, especially working memory and inhibitory control. Controlled processes as attention, inhibitory control and working memory are linked to the functioning of frontal lobes. Therefore, it is important to consider that the frontal areas are vulnerable for sleep disorders. In addition, sleep disorders increase the risk of cognitive decline. On the other hand, executive functions are predictors of dementia in older adults. These results provide evidences that future studies should investigate dementia prevention among elderly individuals through screening and proper management of insomnia.

  • Neurochemistry
Location: Amsterdam

Chair

Hong Ni

National Natural Science Foundation of China, China

Speaker
Biography:

Rodrigo Pascual has completed his MSc and PhD at Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona School of Medicine (Spain). He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals and four books.

Abstract:

Several studies have indicated that abnormal prenatal changes in the circulating glucocorticoids (GCs), induced by either maternal stress or exogenous GC administration, significantly alter the development of Purkinje cell (PC) dendrites and synaptogenesis. However, it is unknown whether a single course of a therapeutic dose prenatally GCs alters the major synaptic vesicle protein synaptophysin (Syn). Thus, in this study we analysed whether a single course of prenatally administered betamethasone phosphate (BET) in pregnant rats changes the immunohistochemical expression of Syn along with locomotor behaviour (rota rod-test). The data obtained showed that in utero BET exposure resulted in a significant immunohistochemical underexpression of Syn and a significant reduction in locomotor behaviour during late postnatal life. In conclusion, our previous and current works indicate that prenatal BET administration significantly modify the cerebellar development. Of note, these and other experimental data do not portend to minimize the beneficial effects of BET administration when there is a risk of respiratory distress/bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants.

Ali H Alwadei

National Neuroscience Institute, Saudi Arabia

Title: Loss-of-function mutation in RUSC2 causes intellectual disability and secondary microcephaly

Time : 13:40-14:00

Speaker
Biography:

Ali H Alwadei currently works at Pediatric Neurology Department, National Neuroscience Institute, King Fahad Medical City, PO Box 59046, Riyadh 11525, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract:

Intellectual disability is seen in up to 1% to 3% of the general population, and is often dichotomized into syn- dromic and nonsyndromic forms.1 A genetic aetiology accounts for about 25% to 50% of cases, with up to 700 monogenic mutations identified so far.2 Recent advances in genetic testing have allowed the identification of an ever- increasing repertoire of genes causing intellectual disabil- ity.2 Characterization of their protein products has shed light onto the diverse biological pathways affected in this important neurological disease that results in significant impairment in cognitive and adaptive behaviour, and which has important medical and social implications.3 Aberrancies in synaptic vesicular transport and intracel- lular protein trafficking have been highlighted among the various biological pathways reported to cause intellectual disability.3 Included in these are mutations in genes coding for Rab proteins (rabaptins), a group of small Ras GTPases that have been shown to play an important role at different levels of the cellular trafficking pathway.4–6 Although over 60 Rab proteins have been identified so far, only a few have been implicated in human disease, including in patients with intellectual disability with or without associ- ated brain malformations.7,8 RUSC2, officially known as RUN and SH3 domain con- taining-2, is a gene found on chromosome 9p13.3 (gene identifier [ID] 9853, Mendelian Inheritance in Man [MIM] 611053). RUSC2 codes for iporin, a ubiquitous protein with moderate to high expression in the human brain.9,10 The literature on the functions of iporin remains sparse, but there is some evidence that it interacts with Rab1b and Rab1-binding protein GM130,10 both of which are also expressed in the brain, with highest expression in dendritic spines where they appear to play an important role in synaptogenesis.11 So far, no mutations in RUSC2 have ever been shown to cause human disease, and no animal models disrupting this gene have been described. However, to our knowledge for the first time, we describe the clinical presentations of three patients (two male siblings and one unrelated female) with severe intellectual disability and microcephaly. Through wholeexome sequencing, all three were found to have inherited homozygous nonsense mutations in RUSC2. This report adds to the expanding landscape of genetic causes of intellectual disability, and suggests that RUSC2, probably through its interactions with Rab proteins and their effector molecules, may play an important role.

Masayuki Yamashita

International University of Health and Welfare, Japan

Title: Electric axon guidance in embryonic retina: Involvement of integrins

Time : 14:00-14:20

Speaker
Biography:

Masayuki Yamashita is a Professor of Physiology at International University of Health and Welfare. He completed his PhD in Department of Neurophysiology, University of Tokyo in 1986. He moved to National Institute for Physiological Sciences (Okazaki, Japan) as a JSPS Fellow and a Research Associate. In 1989, he started physiological studies of retina in Department of Neuroanatomy, Max-Planck-Institute for Brain Research. After the reunification of Germany, he moved to the Department of Physiology, Osaka University Medical School. He studied the calcium signaling systems in embryonic chick retina. Then, he moved to the Department of Physiology, Nara Medical University as a Professor (1999 2014). He has been interested in “The electrophysiological properties of neuroepithelial cells and newborn neurons” The retina is a nice model for studying the early development of central nervous systems.

Abstract:

The axons of embryonic brain, spinal cord and retina extend along the extracellular voltage gradient towards the cathode in a process known as galvanotropism. In embryonic nervous tissues, positive direct current (DC) potentials are generated by neuroepithelial cell’s sodium transport, of which disruption results in erroneous axon path-finding, suggesting that electric fields play a pivotal role in orienting newborn axons. However, the experimental evidence was lacking for the cell surface molecule that is activated asymmetrically in an electric field. Here, it is shown that integrin activation mediates electric axon guidance. Retinal strips of chick embryos were embedded in Matrigel®, and cultured in the electric field of the same strength as that in vivo (15 mV/mm). Matrigel® contained the same extracellular matrix proteins as in the embryonic retina, laminin and collagen, to which integrins bind. Retinal ganglion cell axons extended towards the cathode. A monoclonal anti-chicken integrin antibody (TASC), which enhances integrin-ligand binding, accelerated the cathodal growth. A reduction in the extracellular free Ca2+with EGTA also enhanced the cathodal growth, which suggested that millimolar Ca2+ inhibited axon growth, and also that the influx of Ca2+ was unlikely to be essential for cathodal steering. In the presence of Mn2+, which non-specifically activates integrin-ligand binding, the axons formed local meshes. These results suggested that the inhibition of integrins by the extracellular Ca2+ underlies electric axon guidance.

Jong Wook Chang

Samsung Medical Center, South Korea

Title: The application of human mesenchymal stem cell for Alzheimer’s disease

Time : 14:20-14:40

Biography:

Jong Wook Chang Ph.D has his expertise in translational and clinical research of stem cells for neurological diseases including CNS and PNS. Especially, he has made effort to identify therapeutic soluble factors secreted from human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to understand therapeutic effect of MSC. When he was a director of MEDIPOST Co.,Ltd, he was a leader of clinical trial of MSC therapeutics for Alzheimer’s disease. Now he is responsible for management of cGMP facility in Samsung Medical Center to produce clinical grade of MSC for clinical trials.

Abstract:

Various groups have presented findings that human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have both immunomodulatory and trophic properties. MSCs tend to act indirectly at sites of injury or damage through the secretion of paracrine factors in vitro and in vivo. For example, our studies have been done using a transgenic Alzheimer’s disease mouse model where intraparenchymal injections of MSCs resulted in the reduction of amyloid plaque levels, anti-apoptosis, and activation of endogenous neural stem cell and also activate proteasome in neuron. In addition, efficient MSC delivery is also a significant issue for human study. By possessing a broad range of functions, MSCs hold great potential in being used as a novel treatment for various diseases including neurodegenerative disorders.

  • Dementia and Vascular Dementia
Location: Amsterdam

Chair

Steven Benvenisti

National Trial Lawyers Top 100 Lawyers U.S.A

Co-Chair

Jacqueline A Hinds

Society of Emotional Intelligence, UK

Session Introduction

Si Ching Lim

Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore

Title: Management of challenging behaviors in dementia: A geriatrician’s perspective

Time : 14:40-15:00

Speaker
Biography:

Si Ching Lim has a special interest in Dementia Care particularly in patients with behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. She is currently in charge of a 20 bedded Dementia Ward and is responsible in developing the ward and training the staff in managing elderly with delirium and dementia with challenging behaviors. Current projects involve seeing surgical patients with delirium and dementia post operatively and educating surgical nurses management of BPSD. She is also an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the National University of Singapore and Dukes Graduate Medical School.

Abstract:

Dementia is becoming an expensive disease worldwide and its prevalence is on the rise, particularly in the developing countries. The non-cognitive symptoms of dementia, also known as neuropsychiatric symptoms or behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) is particularly challenging for the caregivers resulting in significant caregiver stress, leading to burnout and institutionalization. BPSD occurs in >90% of people with dementia at some point during the course of their illness. An overview of BPSD: Types of behavioural problems encountered, aetiology of BPSD, approach to treatment of BPSD focusing on person centered care (PCC) and treatment options. For healthcare workers, particularly the ones not trained in geriatric and gerontology, BPSD is challenging and stressful. The majority of caregivers will end up restraining- either physically or chemically, the patients for their safety. Restraining the elderly comes with complications like physical deconditioning, DVT, UTI, urinary retention, constipation, pneumonia, pressure sore, etc. The aim of this presentation is to introduce to the audience the causes of challenging behaviors and how to manage the agitated patients non-pharmacologically, with restraints as a later alternative. The presentation will include 2-3 cases for discussion.

Pieter Hasenaar

ZevHas Lab B.V., The Netherlands

Title: Dementia-App - The caregivers circle

Time : 15:00-15:20

Speaker
Biography:

Pieter Hasenaar owns a media company and his brother Harm is a architect. Since their mother has Alzheimer's disease, they want from their profession to make a positive and innovative contribution to improving the quality of life for all involved. Together they work on this social project. See for more info: www.dementia-app. com. The brothers are assisted with their project for advice and supported by several organizations in the Netherlands, including case and home care managers of mental health care, health insurance company CZ, and Alzheimer’s Netherlands. There also is a Scientific Advisory Board, which has formed by six Dutch universities and their scientists.

Abstract:

Two years ago, the mother of Harm and Pieter was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. At that time they were faced with a world they did not know. After thorough research they themselves decided, with the help of experts, to develop their own App; The dementia-App. The App helps structuring the day living at home with dementia, relieves the immediate environment and allows in this way to everyone's daily life a little bearable.

Dementia is a growing problem. Each year 20,000 people are diagnosed with dementia in the Netherlands. At present, some 250,000 people in the Netherlands have this brain disease, worldwide 48.9 million people. Seventy percent of people with dementia is initially looked after by caregivers and boils down to the shoulders of family and friends. A major concern.

The dementia-App is a digital circle around the loved one with dementia and so the loved one can be supported remotely and this relieves the caregiver. The dementia-App is the digital link between caregiver and care recipient. To make this linkage there are always requires at least two people to create and start the circle.

The dementia-App has several unique features, including the photo album, to reinforce the remembrance. But also Video contact with their precious, playing memory games together and an extensive collection of 200 old journal-videos are available as features in the App. The daily calendar with alarm can be managed remotely. Caregivers can ask each other for information and share experiences through the personal family log. Of course gives dementia-App many important (basic) information and useful tips on the dementia-App Kiosk. Each country has their own tailor made kiosk.

Goal is to make the life for everybody qualitatively something more bearable and try to keep people with dementia longer at home in their own environment. Meanwhile, there is also international interest in this innovative project from Alzheimer's Disease International - A.D.I. The dementia-App is a multiplatform for tablets and mobile and available in the E-stores for all systems, iOS and Android.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Karan Jutlla has completed her PhD in 2011 from Keele University. She became a Senior Lecturer in Dementia studies at the University of Worcester for five years. She recently joined the School of Nursing and Midwifery at De Montfort University in Leicester as a Lecturer in Health and Social Care. She also works as an independent Consultant in Dementia Care Supporting Services to be culturally competent.

 

Abstract:

Vascular dementia has been reported as the most common form of dementia in South Asian communities living in the UK due to higher incidences of hypertension and diabetes. Research on dementia care in these communities has highlighted the need for the need for cultural competency training for those working professionally with people with dementia and their families. It has been evidenced that while many health professionals feel that they need more training to both improve their knowledge about dementia and the cultural norms and religious practices of South Asian people with dementia, access to this sort of training is variable. Because of the acute lack of quantitative and qualitative data about the health and social care needs of South Asian communities, and how they are best met, training to improve cultural competency in services is difficult. This paper reports the findings of research with Sikh carers of a family member with vascular dementia living in Wolverhampton in the UK, highlighting evidence that demonstrates the diversity of the Sikh community and challenges assumptions of homogeneity. The evidence base presented highlights the importance for understanding the psycho-social perspectives of living with vascular dementia for migrant communities and the need for health care professionals and service managers to apply a person-centered approach to care. This paper will help participants to consider person centered care as a model for practice for achieving cultural competency with migrant communities living with dementia in their countries of work. 

Panteleimon Giannakopoulos

University of Geneva, Switzerland

Title: Cerebral microbleeds: Innocent or guilty?

Time : 15:40-16:00

Speaker
Biography:

Panteleimon Giannakopoulos obtained his MD degree in the University of Athens in 1989 before completing a full training on Psychiatry and Psychotherapy in London (Maudsley Hospital) as well as Post-doctoral training in Paris (La Pitié-Sâlpetrière Hospital, Federation of Neurology). In 1998, he was appointed as an Associate Professor and Medical Head of the Division of Geriatric Psychiatry of the University Hospitals of Geneva. Later on (2004) he obtained the position of Full Professor of Psychiatry in the University of Geneva. From 2003 to 2011, he also assumed a parallel position of Full Professor of Old Age Psychiatry in the University of Lausanne in order to promote the academic careers of junior staff locally. He has been the Chairman of the Department of Mental Health and Psychiatry in Geneva for ten years (2005-2015) and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Medicine in the University of Geneva In-charge of postgraduate and continuous education (2003-2011). From December 1st 2015, he is the Medical Head of the Forensic Psychiatry Development in Geneva County. 

Abstract:

The presence of cerebral microbleeds has been associated with dementia and cognitive decline, although studies report conflicting results. Our aim was to determine the potential role of the presence and location of cerebral microbleeds in early stages of cognitive decline. Baseline 3T MR imaging examinations including SWI sequences of 328 cognitively intact community-dwelling controls and 72 subjects with mild cognitive impairment were analyzed with respect to the presence and distribution of cerebral microbleeds. A neuropsychological follow-up of controls was performed at 18 months post inclusion and identified cases with subtle cognitive deficits were referred to as controls with a deteriorating condition. Group differences in radiologic parameters were studied by using nonparametric tests, one-way analysis of variance, and Spearman correlation coefficients. Cerebral microbleed prevalence was similar in subjects with mild cognitive impairment and controls with stable and cognitively deteriorating conditions (25%-31.9%). In all diagnostic groups, lobar cerebral microbleeds were more common. They occurred in 20.1% of all cases compared with 6.5% of cases with deep cerebral microbleeds. None of the investigated variables (age, sex, microbleed number, location and depth, baseline Mini-Mental State Examination score, and the Fazekas score) were significantly associated with cognitive deterioration with the exception of education of >12 years showing a slight but significant protective effect (OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.22-0.92; P=0.028). The Mini-Mental State Examination and the Buschke total score were correlated with neither the total number nor lobar-versus-deep location of cerebral microbleeds. Cerebral microbleed presence, location, and severity are not related to the early stages of cognitive decline in advanced age.

  • Molecular Neurosciences and Neuro transmitters
Location: Amsterdam

Chair

Mootaz Salamn

Sheffield Hallam University, UK

Session Introduction

Eva Kudova

Czech Academy of Sciences, Czech Republic

Title: SMART steroids: Steroidal molecules as rapid-acting therapeutics

Time : 16:20-16:40

Speaker
Biography:

Eva Kudova has been working at the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry in Prague, Czech Academy of Sciences (IOCB) since 2002. She completed her PhD in 2009 from Charles University in Prague. Then, she spent 2 years in the lab of Douglas F. Covey, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri, USA. Since 2011, she works at the IOCB as the project PI at Targeted Research Group of Steroidal Inhibitors. Her main focus of interest is steroidal chemistry, she has been working in this field for more than 10 years. Her major avenue of investigation is design and synthesis of new neuroactive steroidal compounds and structure-activity relationship studies affording NMDARs ligands. Also, she and her colleagues have proposed screening pipeline that should serve as a screening platform for neuroactive steroids targeting CNS diseases and showing neurosteroids´ drug-likeness. 

Abstract:

Neurosteroids are compounds synthesized in the nervous tissue from cholesterol, or steroidal precursors from peripheral sources. It is believed that neurosteroids execute their effects by modulating the activity of different membrane receptors, including the glutamatergic ionotropic receptors, e.g. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). The NMDARs play an important role in development, synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory, however, abnormal activation of NMDA receptors have been shown to mediate neuronal degeneration/cell death. To find novel potentially beneficial drugs to treat neurological damage or neurodegeneration is one of the most investigated areas in contemporary pharmacology and neuroscience. Therefore, we have designed and synthesized a library of SMART Steroids – Steroidal Molecules As Rapid-acting Therapeutics. SMART steroids are neuroactive molecules, targeting primarily NMDARs, show neuroprotective properties, and minimal side effects in animal models. Our screening pipeline currently covers physicochemical and biological properties like: (i) solubility (DLS); (ii) lipophilicity (logP, logD, ΔGsolv); (iii) patch-clamp recordings from HEK293 cells assessing NMDAR inhibition rates and IC50 values; (iv) Caco-2 assay, (v) treatment of glutamate and NMDA-induced neurotoxicity (survival rate, caspase-3, intracellular calcium levels, ROS); (vi) in vitro growth of postnatal neurons after neurosteroid administration, (vii) models of animal behavior (open field, elevated plus maze, forced swim test, etc.); (viii) PTZ-induced seizures; (ix) paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy; (x) pharmacokinetic properties. Our results indicate that these compounds do afford neuroprotective effect and as such, SMART steroids may be beneficial in treatment of several neurological diseases like epilepsy, neuropathic pain, AD, PD and others. Broad patent portfolio has been developed protecting compounds, production and its use for treatment in neurology etc. (EP 2313424, US 2012071453, EP 2675821, WO2016029888 A1). Supported by grant TE01020028 Center for Development of Original Drugs from the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic and RVO 61388963.

Biography:

Mohamed Shaban is currently working at Cairo University as a special surgeon from the year 2009 to 2017. He has many research works published. This is one of the latest research he submitted to the university.

Abstract:

Object: Adjacent-segment failure is a well-known risk of lumbar fixation. The aim of this retrospective study was to identify risk factors for next-segment failure in lumbar fixation for degenerative instability.
 
Method: We retrospectively evaluated 122 patients who underwent of lumbar fixation for degenerative instability from 2011 to 2014 in Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University. All procedures were performed by a single surgeon. The patients with next-segment failure underwent neurological assessment, radiographic studies and sequential follow-up examinations. The mean follow-up period for this group was 30 months.
 
Results: 33 patients of 122 fusion procedures were performed in women who were postmenopausal. A total of 19 patients of 125 patients developed symptomatic next-segment degeneration at a previously asymptomatic level; 15 were postmenopausal women. All women were postmenopausal, and 50% received bisphosphonate drugs and calcium supplementation preoperatively for osteopenia. 20% of all patients with next-segment failure were cigarette smokers. Next-segment diseases included spondylolisthesis (52%), spinal canal stenosis due to disc herniation and/or facet hypertrophy (33%), stress fracture (12%), and scoliosis (3%). Patients may have more than one degenerative process at the next segment.
 
Conclusions: Postmenopausal women show the highest risk of adjacent-segment failure for patients in whom lumbar fusion with rigid instrumentation is performed to treat degenerative instability.

Biography:

Getachew Desta Alemayehu completed his Doctor of Medicine at Gondar University and has one and half years of working experience as a Lecturer at Bahir Dar University. Currently, he is a fourth year Resident in Surgery at Bahir Dar University.

Abstract:

Background: Craniopagus parasiticus is a rare medical case and it is unique unlike other cases reported from different literature. The head of parasitic twins is protruding from the temporal area of cranium. Parasitic head has two deformed lower limbs; one is too rudimentary attached to the mass; long bones of bilateral lower limbs and some pelvic bones. After dissection of the mass, the intestine was seen but no chest organs and other abdominal organs. There is also rudimentary labium but no vaginal opening.
 
Case Presentation: A 38-years-old multigravida (gravida V para IV) women from Amhara ethnicity referred from rural health center to referral hospital due to prolonged second state of labor at 42+1 weeks. Upon arrival, she had contraction, term sized gravid uterus, and fetal heart beat was 112. On digital pelvic examination the cervix was fully diluted, station of the head was high and the pulsating umbilical cord coming in front of the presenting part with ruptured membrane but yet in the vaginal canal. The team decided emergency cesarean section and then a live female infant weighing 4200 g was delivered. The placenta was single and normal. The APGAR scores were seven and nine at one and five min, respectively. The infant appeared to be grossly normal except the parasitic co-twin attached at the cranium. The neonate was investigated with the available investigations (CBC, X-Ray, Doppler ultrasound) and pediatric side consultation made. After a week of counseling and investigations, successful separation operation was done. During post-operative time the neonate comfortably suckling on breasts and no neurological deficit. The details of the surgery, post- operative condition & subsequent follow up will be discussed during the conference.
 
Conclusion: The possible etiologies of craniopagus parasiticus are still unknown due to a rarity of cases. Doctors, genetic scientists, epidemiologists and researchers continue to investigate this case as the reasons that could give clue to birth defect and to provide answer for better prognosis of cases and improve the life chances of the twins. This case will have some input in the effort to know the etiology and pathogenesis of this new borns.

Deepa Vinoo

New York City Health and Hospitals, USA

Title: Comfort Care in Dementia

Time : 17:20-17:40

Speaker
Biography:

Deepa Vinoo is the assistant director of Nursing,(Director of Memory Care ), NYC Health and Hospitals “As a team leader, I had an opportunity to really change our facility’s practice and culture to improve the quality of lives of residents who have dementia ... patient-centered care is the key.” As director of the Memory Care Unit at NYC Health + Hospitals/Coler, Deepa Vinoo leads an interdisciplinary team that utilizes innovative techniques to effectively, holistically, and compassionately care for residents diagnosed with dementia. She has been leading award winning project “ Reduction of Antipsychotics in Dementia Related Behavior’. Vinoo has spearheaded ongoing training that has updated Coler’s caregiving approach to align with Alzheimer’s Association best practices and has helped 95 percent of her team to earn National Council of Certified Dementia Care Practitioners certification. “Music & Memory” is a standout program led by Vinoo at Coler; this program uses familiar music to reach behind the veil of dementia in order to draw out persons hidden behind the disability and reengage them with the world. Through this and other advanced treatment programs led by Vinoo, Coler has achieved significant reduction in antipsychotic medication administered to residents diagnosed with dementia, increased engagement and satisfaction among residents’ families, and fostered better interaction between residents and staff – a relationship vital to improving successful long-term care. With more than 20 years of experience as a nursing instructor administrator and clinician, Vinoo holds an MSN degree in Psychiatric Nursing. Ms.Vinoo is a board certified gerontological Nurse and a Certified Dementia Care Practitioner.

Abstract:

Behavioral disturbances among patients with dementia, including agitation, aggression, and psychosis, form a constellation of symptoms referred to as behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). These impact heavily on resident’s quality of life, caregiver stress, and management options for the team. In the United States, the National Partnership to Improve Dementia Care, established a new national goal of reducing the use of antipsychotic medications in long-stay nursing home residents by providing person centered Comprehensive interdisciplinary care. Implement National partnership’s goals and CMS regulatory standards to improve Dementia Care. Improve the quality of care of residents with diagnosis of Dementia by providing person centered memory Care programs. Reduce falls and physical altercations by meaningful engagement. Reduce the usage of antipsychotics by implementing non pharmacological behavior management in Dementia related behavior. This study was conducted in four Memory care units with 108 residents at an 815-bed long-term nursing care facility. All residents in Memory Care Units from last quarter of 2014 to 3rd quarter of 2016 were individually assessed for Physical Altercations, Fall, Usage of Music and Memory and Usage of Antipsychotics.

Speaker
Biography:

Paula Kielbik is currently PhD student at the Warsaw University of Life Sciences at Faculty of Veterinary Medicine. She completed both her Bachelor and Master of Science degrees under supervision of dr Michal Godlewski in Nanotechnology Laboratory in collaboration wit Polish Intitute of Physics. In her scientific work she focused mainly on biodistribution of biodegradable nanoparticles in the living organism. The main aspect of her work was transfer of nanoparticles through the organism barriers (i.e. intestinal barrier, blood-brain barrier, blood-testis barrier) by ZnO-derieved NPs in adult organism. Working as a member of a team in Nanotechnology Laboratory Paula was involved in the development and assessment of compherehesive methodology for the evaluation of gastrointestinal absorption, circulation and elimination from the organism of biodegradable nanoparticles. 

Abstract:

Zinc oxide nanaoparticles (ZnO NPs) became promising material for numerous applications, includind biomedicine. Avaible reports assessing their biodistribution present contradictory conclusions. Furthermore transfer of NPs through the blood-brain barrier has not been reported extensively. In our study we orally administrated fluorescent1 ZnO NPs doped with Europim (ZnO:Eu) to mice (n=35). After 3h, 24h, 7d, 14d or 1m mice were sacrificed and internal organs were collected for the assessment of biodistribution and localization of NPs in the organism. For the analyses we proposed a novel comprehensive and innovative approach. Along with the measurement of Zn concentration in organs with spectroscopy method (AAS), we performed quantitative and qualitative cytometric evaluation of collected samples. The distribution patterns of ZnO:Eu NPs within tissues were statistically assessed with scanning cytometry, while the extent of biodegradation was semiquantitatively elucidated by confocal microscopy. Results revealed very rapid and efficient uptake and distribution of ZnO:Eu NPs to key organs and tissues, also crossing physiological barriers. Spleen, as well as fat tissue were responsible for accumulation of NPs, and liver with kidney were designated for their elimination2. An interesting pattern of biodistribution of NPs in the brain was also observed. Following 3h after IG administration, we observed crossing of the blood-brain barrier by ZnO:Eu NPs and their uniform distribution in the brain. Similar observations were reported earlier for non-biodegradable ZrO2:Pr NPs3 and Y2O3:Eu NPs4. The peek of NPs transfer to the brain seems to take place 24h post IG with majority of NPs allocated in the areas of dense neuronal networks, limbic system and cerebellum. During following days we observed a drop of NPs-related fluorescence, however the association with limbic system and dense neuronal networks remained. We speculate, that elimination of the NPs from the brain might consequential of biodegradation of NPs and their efficient elimination via neuronal transport5.

Acknowledgments:

NCN: DEC-2012/05/E/NZ4/02994

NCN: 20/0139/N/ST3/04189